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Coming “Post-Coronavirus Construction Tsunami”

While there are many stories of doom and gloom, especially around the economy, there are glimmers of hope. One in particular came from Keith Prather, a market intelligence expert for the business management consulting firm Pioneer IQ. They developed something called the “Fear and Recovery Curve” model to indicate when the crisis would end and what the recovery would look like. And the future, Prather says, is rosy.

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Pandemic Architecture: International Ideas Competition

ArchDaily is sponsoring a design competition for designing a city in post-pandemic times—specifically, urban designs. We’ve seen all too well, from Italy to China to New York City, how a tightly-packed population can spread disease rapidly to devastating effect. It is with this in mind that the Pandemic Architecture Competition is being held to look for innovative new designs that manage to house many people while keeping them safe.

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Everything Old is New Again: Architectural Lessons About COVID

COVID-19 has changed the country irrevocably and the fallout will last for decades if not centuries. There is no way to foretell all the many ways that the world will be different because of the pandemic, but some architects are looking to past styles when thinking about future construction. Everything old is new again.

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The Zoom of Construction Work?

Many entire industries are sheltering in place and working from home, but construction is one sector that is often referred to as ‘essential’, meaning that the workers have to continue on the job and do their best to maintain social distance. But new technology is right around the corner that may put workers at home, behind a desk.

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Architecture Firms Lobby for Stimulus Relief

In a letter addressed to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the American Institute of Architects asked for improved aid, including loans and tax breaks, to help architecture firms amid the economic downturn caused by COVID-19.

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Construction Is Continuing as an Essential Service—But Not Everyone Agrees

With a third of the United States on lockdown, including the three largest cities (New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago), something is continuing unabated—construction. In California, Governor Gavin Newsom labeled construction as an “essential service” alongside things like healthcare and food service. And while some construction projects are easily labeled as essential—things like road repair, and maintenance of water and transit infrastructure, it may be hard to understand what is so essential about the construction of housing or commercial projects.

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Italian Architecture Firm Designs ICU That Can Fit in a Shipping Crate

Italy has been the country hit the hardest by the coronavirus, seeing an almost 9% death rate (more than 8,000 deaths as of March 27th), and the country is struggling to handle the massive need for hospital space. That’s why the architecture firm Carlo Ratti Associati designed an intensive care unit that can be easily packaged and sent to areas in need.

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How COVID-19 Will Change Architecture

It’s hard not to pay attention to the environment around you during this massive health crisis, whether you’re weathering out the storm at work or working from home (or, worse, laid off). Many people are using their quarantined time to disinfect, clean, and organize, and it has caused many people to reevaluate the spaces they live in and the spaces they hope to return to soon, including public spaces such as hospitals, airports, gyms, offices, and hotels.

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Emergency Construction of Temporary Field Hospital Underway in Washington

Construction on a temporary field hospital started on Wednesday on a Shoreline soccer field near Seattle, Washington. As of March 19th, Washington had over 1300 cases of the virus, one of the hardest-hit states in the country.

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Construction Companies Doing Their Part to Help Hospital Workers

All across the nation there has been a dramatic shortage in several essential items, but one in particular is protective masks. While hospitals have masks in storage for their needs, the coronavirus pandemic has all but depleted their stores of the precious safety equipment—and they haven’t been helped by the members of the panicked public who bought through Amazon, and other online retailers’, stocks in a matter of hours. This has left emergency workers scrambling to find masks, with some nurses and doctors resorting to using bandannas and strips of cloth.

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California’s Strictest-Yet Quarantine Order Does Not Apply to Some Construction

The massive stay-at-home order issued by Governor Gavin Newsom of California, which restricts 40 million people to their home except for emergency trips to the store, the gas station, or the doctor, does not appear to affect the construction industry. Although it was not mentioned specifically in the executive order issued March 19th, a notice on the government’s website lists construction as one of the sectors not affected.

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5 Ways the Coronavirus Will Affect Construction

Steve Lesser, the chair of Becker’s Construction law practice, says the key words right now are “Wait and see.”

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Coronavirus Didn’t Slow Down ConExpo, Largest Construction Convention in North America

Last week ConExpo went ahead as planned in Las Vegas, bringing in 130,000 attendees to the once-every-three-years event. The expo takes up 2.7 million square feet of space and is truly staggering in its scope. Taking place on March 10, before most travel bans and mass closures were instituted, the expo move forward on schedule.

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Two Men Sentenced in Architecture Forgery Scheme

Two California men were sentenced to one year in jail and five years probation after they were convicted of more than 200 counts of forgery in an architecture and engineering scheme.

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How to Hire and Retain Women in the Construction Workforce

Sunday, March 8th, is International Women’s Day, a day that does not celebrate the superiority of women to men, but the importance of gender equality in the workforce and society. But that equality in the construction field is lacking. Women make up 50% of the U.S. labor force, but only 10% of the construction industry.

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The Umbrella Method to Building Bridges

A new kind of bridge manufacturing method, nicknamed the umbrella method, has been introduced in Germany, and it promises an entirely new, revolutionary way to span bridges without extensive scaffolding.

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Tiny Home Village Finally Under Construction

After years of delays really to zoning regulations and community concerns, a small, 30-home experiment is being built in Albuquerque.

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Procore Technologies Files for IPO with SEC

Project management software giant Procore Technologies Inc has held its cards close to its chest in the decision to go public, but last Friday the answer came forth loud and clear as the company filed the paperwork with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) announcing its plans for an initial public offering (IPO). No date for the IPO has been set, but they say it will happen in the “near future”.

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Coronavirus is Hampering Construction Efforts in United States

Even though there have been very few cases of the coronavirus confirmed in the United States, it has already impacted the construction industry in several places and may spread to more.

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First Fully Autonomous Large Construction Equipment

While robots and autonomous equipment has been used for mapping and scanning jobsites, for the first time fully autonomous heavy equipment has been introduced and is getting ready to be put on the market.

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How the Dutch Use Architecture

If you were to guess which country on earth had the highest agriculture exports, you’d probably pick the United States, and you’d be right. But if you were to pick second place? Would it be Canada, with its vast land area? China, with their bustling export business? It would have to be a big country, wouldn’t it? Known for cutting edge technology?

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Including People Skills in Construction Management

In business schools across America, managers are taught to use the “soft skills” that can’t be measured with a calculator. Hard skills include things like accounting, productivity, efficiency, and output. Soft skills are the harder to compile things like communication, empathy, teamwork, flexibility and problem solving. For a long time, construction management has historically glossed over these things, with a “get ‘er done” approach that assumes that production is the only thing that matters.

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What is Classical Architecture and Why Is There an Uproar?

In recent weeks, the architecture community has been in a tizzy over a document that was released from the Whitehouse entitled “Making Federal Buildings Great Again.” As can be guessed from the title alone, the proposal was presented by the Trump administration, and it was controversial. But what does it all mean and why is there a controversy at all?

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New Forecast Says 2.7 Million Construction Jobs to be Automated by 2057

MEPI, an organization that focuses on infrastructure and construction in the Midwest, reports that their forecasts say that 2.7 million jobs currently done by laborers will be done by autonomous robots by the year 2057. As an example, they point to brick laying robots, which can lay thousands of bricks in a day, compared to human bricklayers, who average about 500.

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School Construction Costs are Skyrocketing

In 2016, California construction company C.W. Driver began work on a new 94,000 foot school in Irvine, and the costs came in at $475 per square foot. Fast forward to 2019, and a similar school (both are K-8, and both in Irvine) is pricing out at $598 per square foot. That’s a 26% jump in just three years, and it’s not restricted to California.

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Multifamily Construction Starts Rose Just 1% Last Year

According to the National Association of Home Builders, despite increasing demand for multifamily properties, construction starts rose just 1% to 381,000 and are expected to increase just 1% more to 383,000 in 2020, though an increase of 4% is expected in 2021.

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Up-And-Coming Jobsite Danger: Personal Cellphones

Even as smartphones are breaking open the world of construction with new apps and technologies that are radically changing the face of the industry, there is a problem that is plaguing job sites and doesn’t seem to have any sign of stopping soon: the presence of mobile phones.

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Construction Equipment Stocks on the Rise (and Fall)

Construction machinery stocks have trailed the S&P 500 by about 20% over the last year due to a variety of factors, including trade deals with China and the current state of unfavorable farming conditions. But despite these setbacks, data shoes that the global construction equipment industry is set to reach $90 billion this year, up from $70 billion in 2016. The same data shows that overall construction spending, which was at $1.3 trillion in 2019, will reach $1.45 trillion in 2023.

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Is Fungus the Future of Sustainable Building?

On this blog we’ve covered the topic of sustainable construction and the carbon footprint of buildings before, to the point where it may seem like a broken record. But a new technology has turned the sustainable construction field on its head: fungus.

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Top Construction Projects to Watch in 2020

Construction Dive has put out their top six construction projects to watch in the coming year. They’re wide and varied, but each is interesting and will be making headlines.

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Rapid Construction on Hospital in China to Combat Wuhan Coronavirus

Two hospital in China are being special-built specifically to combat the dangerous coronavirus, and a new video from the construction company shows a time-lapse video of the breakneck construction.

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Innovative Materials and Products Coming in 2020

According to the National Science Board’s 2020 Vision for the National Science Foundation, these are two exciting materials to watch in the coming year.

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70% of Contractors Don’t Have a Technology Roadmap

A new study by FMI Corp, sponsored by Procore Technologies, found that contractors are not only not taking advantage of existing technological advancements in their current work, but don’t have a plan in place to implement new technologies in the future. This is concerning, though not surprising, as construction has traditionally been slow to adopt new technology despite the promise of savings and efficiency.

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New Concrete Technology Changing the Future of Green Building

As we’ve mentioned on this blog before, concrete and concrete production leaves a massive carbon footprint—approximately 6% of all carbon released into the atmosphere comes just from the laying of concrete. These new technologies are seeking to mitigate that in new and exciting ways.

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Urban Planning is Changing as the World Urbanizes

By 2050, 68% of the world’s population is expected to live in cities. The biggest cities—known as megacities—are almost hard to comprehend: Tokyo is the biggest at 37 million people, followed by Dehli at 29 million and Shanghai at 26 million. It’s enough to make the United States’ largest city, New York City at 8.3 million, look quaint.

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Tragic Fire Reveals Secrets into Medieval Architecture

In April of 2019, an electrical fire in the roof of the Notre Dame de Paris, a cathedral that has stood as a national and international landmark for 850 years, sparked a blaze that tore through the ceiling beams and partially collapsed the roof. However much a tragedy, architects are turning lemons into lemonade by using the reconstruction process to determine just how, exactly, the magnificent cathedral was built and stood so solidly for so many centuries.

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Economists Weigh In on 2020 Construction

Economists have been announcing their predictions and forecasts for the new year, and some of the news isn’t as good as we’d like—but it’s not all bad.

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Texas Lego Construction Competition Aims to Get Young Girls into Construction

The Block Kids Building Competition, a partnership between the Girl Scouts of Central Texas and the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) with feature 50 girls from kindergarten to sixth grade. Each will get 100 bricks and an hour to build whatever they choose.

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Construction Trends to Watch for in the New Year

We’ve talked about a lot of construction trends over the past year—some growing and some waning—but here are five things that we feel confident about saying will be dominant trends in construction in 2020.

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Hotel Construction is Booming—Or, It Should Be

Hotel construction plans are, on paper, on track to be the highest growth trend since 2007. The hotel industry has reported year-over-year increases in growth in occupancy, average daily rates, and revenue per available room, according to STR, a group which monitors trends in the hospitality sector. In October there were 1500 hotel projects under construction in the United States.

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Cut Down A Tree, Save The Climate?

The prevailing train of thought in environmentalism has long been to plant more trees, but it may be that forestry has more than one way it can help reduce climate change.

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Salt Lake City Construction Company Models Suicide Prevention Ideals

RK Construction, a 55-year-old construction company based in Salt Lake City, Utah, has become a model of what it means to confront mental health problems head on, according to a recent report on NPR.

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Six Steps For De-Carbonizing Construction

At an October construction technology conference in Singapore, Atkins CEO Keith Clarke told executives that if global temperatures rise two degrees Celsius in the next 20 years then instead of worrying about their pensions they should instead “buy a shotgun” because of “mass migrations, upheaval, and extinctions.”

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Silicon Valley Making Pledges to Address Housing Construction

California’s Bay Area, home to Silicon Valley, where Facebook, Apple, Google, and Microsoft all call home, has a housing problem that is unmatched anywhere, even in Manhattan, the most expensive of cities: the Bay Area’s “low income” designation now applies to a family of four making less than $117,000 a year. The state of California has more than 134,000 homeless, and in the Bay Area that has increased by 17% since 2017.

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Still a Good Old Boy’s Club?

While there is the ever-present labor shortage in construction and skilled labor, the industry still lags in attracting women to the workforce. In an industry that has been dominated by men, female representation in construction has only increased 3% since 2007, according for the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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One World Trade Center Leading Sustainability Charge

The observatory of One World Trade Center, the main building of the rebuilt World Trade Center complex, has a distinct smell to it. Aside from offering 360 degree views of New York City, the observatory has piped in the smell of trees and plants native to New York: beeches, mountain ashes, and red maples.

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Boston Dynamics “Spot” is Entering Construction

For years we’ve seen Spot, the Boston Dynamics robot making viral videos walking, climbing, jumping, and doing other gymnastics. But now it’s going to get some jobsite training.

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Reasons Why Construction Companies Fail

At the upcoming CONEXPO in Las Vegas in 2020, Larry Kokklenberg, PhD, will be presenting on the top ten reasons that construction businesses fail. Two thirds of these businesses fail within the first five year, and he says that most of the owners blame external sources, like insurance, taxes, or politics. But he’s identified ten things that businesses do to hamstring themselves. You can read the whole article at Daily Commercial News, but here are five of them.

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Four New Technologies that Will Change Construction

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Wearable Technology the Latest in Construction Safety

Just under five thousand American died on the job in 2017, and 20% of them were construction workers, according to statistics from the Occupational Safety and Health Association (OSHA). Of those deaths, 381 were falls, 80 were struck by an object, 71 were electrocutions, and 50 were caught-in/between. These are known in construction as the Fatal Four.

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New Jobsite Technology Can Help Contractors Avoid Lawsuits

Every contractor fears an unknown problem leading to a lawsuit, and new technologies are being introduced more and more to combat those fears and safeguard contractors. Three main categories of technologies are coming forward: scheduling software, 3D modeling tools, and data collection devices.

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Coastal Construction on the Rise—But So is Sea Level

“Coastal ... real estate development is continuing to be faster than inland, which means we are continuing to put ourselves at risk,” says Susan Wachter, a real estate professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

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Labor Shortage May Be Hiding Potential Recession

Two things seem to be on the lips of construction managers everywhere: there is certainly a labor shortage, and there’s talk of a recession. But construction has typically been a bell weather for economic ups and downs—construction sees the slowdowns before anyone else, and it sees the pickup before other industries—and there’s no sign of a recession right now.

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Women in Construction and #MoveOverBob

Encouraged to pursue construction after winning a contest for the This Old House magazine, due to her expert kitchen remodel, Angela Cacace joined a local building program. Although the 32-year-old former barber was nervous, she was pleased to find that of the twelve people in the program, half were women. She posted happily about it on social media, using the hashtag #MoveOverBob, in reference to the children’s Bob the Builder show.

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Construction for Starship 39A Launch and Landing Facility Taking Off

Built at the Kennedy Space Center pad complex, the new launch and landing facilities for the SpaceX Starship Mk2 prototype rocket are heavy construction. Although work only began three weeks ago, photos show heavy equipment has already cleared a large area next to the 39A ramp.

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Construction Industry Sees Drop in Deal Activity, Output Growth

North America’s construction and real-estate industry saw a drop in overall deal activity during the second quarter of 2019, according to GlobalData.

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Home Depot Foundation Fights Skilled Labor Shortage

The Home Depot Foundation announced its next phase of a $50 million pledge to train 20,000 skilled tradespeople by 2028. They’re partnering with Home Builders Institute to implement youth trades training for high school students in at-risk communities.

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Construction Noise a Nuisance All Night

Michael Riley, a Manhattan-based research scientist for Google, considered installing $40,000 sound-proof windows before settling on a more cost-efficient choice: a pair of $250 noise-cancelling headphones. He had found out that contractors at a nearby building had received an after-hours variance permit that allowed late-night construction.

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Building Futures Changing Lives

A year ago, Jaqueline Haller was homeless, addicted to drugs and behind bars. Today she is starting an apprenticeship with the Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 189, as part of the Building Futures program.

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Five Ted Talks that For Construction and Design Professionals

Stunning buildings made from raw, imperfect materials

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Caterpillar and Deere Stocks Taking a Tumble as Recession Worries Begin

With the slowing of both commercial and residential construction, and rumors of an impending recession grow, two mainstay companies in the construction industry are seeing their values dipping—particularly because of the lack of demand for backhoes, cranes, and dump trucks.

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Are Pre-Fab “Lego” Houses the Solution to the Housing Crisis?

Not much has changed in the home construction industry in the last fifty years. Workers show up to a site, dig, pour, frame, sheath, and finish a house, with a nationwide average cost of $428,000 a piece. And that’s when there’s proper space to find that jobsite and enough skilled laborers to do the work.

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Could “Tall Wood” Buildings Be the Future of High Rises?

In what may seem counter-intuitive to progress, there is a global resurgence of so-called “tall wood” buildings, which are defined as structures that are made primarily from timber framing and are more than fourteen stories or fifty meters tall.

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Uprooting Green Space Can Have Decades of Impact

We’ve all seen a construction project tear up existing grass, trees, shrubs and earth—temporarily, to be replanted and “restored” later. But what impact does the temporary disruption really have on the landscape, fauna, and human usage?

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Growing Up Instead of Out

As cities grow, it’s inevitable that they must begin to increase in density. Urban sprawl will always exist, but city centers grow, and there’s only one direction for a downtown to grow: up. As they grow up instead of out, they’re faced with many positives and negatives. This is healthy and positive. Growth in a city is good. But the question of whether you’re growing in the right ways is important for a building planner to consider. Here are a few pluses and minuses to increasing density:

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Top Ten Construction-Related Podcasts

While we try to keep you informed on construction news, there’s so much that we at PowerTools can’t cover. Here is a list of ten great construction-related podcasts that can help you keep abreast of everything newsworthy in the industry.

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Colorado Considering Changes to Labor Laws

Colorado lawmakers are looking to expand labor laws that will affect all areas of the workforce, but especially construction, as they seek to raise minimum wage and worker protections.

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Housing Market Slumps as Trade War with China Grows

The current trade war with China—which just increased tariffs on $300 billion in Chinese goods—is having an impact on nearly every product that comes from China, leading many companies to have to adjust pricing, reevaluate new policies, and even seek new sources for their supply chains.

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EEOC Sues a Florida Company for Telling an Applicant They Don’t Hire Women

Florida construction company passed over the application to hire a woman as a heavy equipment operator because of her gender, according to a lawsuit filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on August 27th.

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Universal Access to Parks and Plazas

Parks and plazas are designed as gathering places for communities, meant to enrich lives and cultural experience, but recent studies show that that is not the case. While the elderly make up 20% of the population, only 4% of park users are elderly. The problem, according to one study, is accessibility.

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Ancient Ruins Found During Construction Project in Colorado

During preliminary construction on a proposed highway in Durango, Colorado, workers uncovered remarkably well-preserved archaeological ruins, most likely dating back to the Ancestral Puebloan period (commonly referred to as the Anasazi).

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Drones and Robots on Jobsites

As we’ve discussed at length on this blog, the labor shortage is requiring construction companies to look outside the box to solve their productivity problems, and they are increasingly turning to technology. The progress has been relatively slow compared of other automated fields, such as manufacturing, but progress is being made, and new tech on the horizon looks promising.

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Catcalling Women Must Stop, Owners Demand

The owner of a Boston-based construction company, Cathartes, has laid down the law when it comes his workers making catcalls from construction sites: do it and you’re fired.

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Three Industry Disruptors Coming in the Next Decade

In a recent meeting of the American Concrete Institute, Brian Moore of the FMI Institute stated that the future is changing and that there are three factors that will either make or break a construction company in the next ten years.

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Housing Nonprofit Begins Training New Workers

While the Habitat for Humanity has long been working to provide good housing at affordable rates, and owners are given a chance to put sweat equity and volunteerism into their work, one worksite in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, has changed their model to not only providing housing, but providing job training.

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How Blockchain Will Change Construction

Blockchain, the technology that powers things like bitcoin, is set to revolutionize the way that construction companies, engineering firms, architects, and customers interact. Blockchain is defined as a growing list of records, or blocks, that are connected using cryptography. Each block contains a link to the previous block, a timestamp, and transaction data. It’s a little like communicating on the cloud, but with intense security, and on some serious steroids.

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Single Family Rental Homes the Latest Trend in Residential Construction

While builders have always sold some of their homes for rental purposes, new reports show that this has increased dramatically—and some homebuilders are becoming the landlords themselves.

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Grassi and Co.’s 2019 Construction Industry Survey Results

To take the pulse of the construction industry, Grassi and Co. hired an independent survey group to take a three-month survey of the industry in New York, and the results are in.

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New Law Allows Construction Workers to Flag Traffic Violators

A new law in the state of Minnesota allows construction workers to flag traffic violators who are driving unsafely in construction zones.

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Construction Spending Sees Huge Drop

Residential and non-residential construction saw their biggest decline in seven months, while government spending saw their biggest drop in seventeen years.

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2020 Olympic Venues Nearing Completion

Tokyo 2020 Olympic organizers have released a report outlining their readiness for the Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. According to the report, more than half of all venues have been completed with just a year to go.

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Long Island Industrial District Being Reinvigorated as Green Space

Westbury, New York, officials are rezoning a degraded industrial sector near the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) into a sprawling green space, in an effort to increase sustainability.

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Construction Worker Saves Children From Fire

At a burning apartment complex in Albuquerque, New Mexico, a father had to lean out a window and drop his 2-month-old baby into the arms of a rescuing construction worker. The father was trapped on the second floor. Seconds later, the worker caught and saved a toddler as well.

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Developers and Urban Planners Consider What To Do With Closed Golf Courses

From a peak in 2003, golfing across the United States has declined by a whopping 20%. Two hundred courses closed last year alone, and it’s leaving many people to wonder what to do with the empty green space in their neighborhoods—land that was once well-maintained and paid for, but land which has gone out of use.

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Widespread Beliefs About US Infrastructure Spending May Be Unfounded

It is a fact that much of the United States infrastructure is deteriorating rapidly, but the commonly held belief that our spending on such infrastructure has dramatically decreased does not appear to be upheld by the evidence, according to a new report from the Brookings Institute.

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Is The Focus on Modern Construction Automation Misplaced?

hh2 Powertools reported on the rapid growth in investment into construction automation, but an editorial by Chris Stanley, of the Concrete Block Association, says that it’s an enticing solution that overlooks the real problems.

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Heavy Market Investment in Construction Automation May Signal Change in Industry

Investors are pouring money into construction technology start-ups at a rapidly increasing rate, and it’s making many in the industry stop and take notice.

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Canadian Construction Workers Took a Moment of Silence for Safety

Last week, after a particularly bad year for workplace accidents, 4000 construction workers took a break from their jobs to take a moment to reflect on safety. More than 50 companies and organizations joined in the second annual Construction Safety Stand-Down, a program hosted by the Newfoundland and Labrador Construction Safety Association

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Vocational Training in Juvenile Detention Center Offers New Lease on Life

This is a bulldozer and forklift simulator. Students using it can earn three different heavy equipment certifications. “The kids, they know, you know, that could be real money, instead of what they’re getting out on the street,” says Earl Gale, one of the instructors at Sojourn High Vocational Lab, inside a juvenile detention center. Gale has been an instructor there for 12 years.

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Antarctic Construction Project Estimated to Cost $250 Million

In what is expected to be harsh conditions, a New Zealand construction company is undertaking a $250 million development on the Scott Base of Antarctica. The 10,000 square foot base, comprising three buildings, is expected to house 100 personnel against the freezing temperatures.

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National Craft Championships Names Clemon Prevost Craft Instructor of the Year

The National Craft Championship, an organization that gathers competitors from around the country to compete in trades and crafts, recently recognized Clemon Prevost, a senior talent development specialist for Fluor’s U.S. Gulf Coast Craft Training Center in Pasadena, Texas, the 2019 Craft Instructor of the Year. Prevost was honored during the Careers in Construction Awards at ABC Convention 2019 in Long Beach, California.

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Viral Social Media Post Shows Not To Judge a Construction Worker by his Dirt

In a post that went viral in late June, a construction worker in Vancouver, Washington, a construction worker made a social media post after overhearing a woman make disparaging comments about his appearance.

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In Addition to Loss of Trade Workers, the Construction Industry Also Needs Architects

Ten years ago when the economy dropped, not only did many workers leave the industry, but many students fled the architecture and surveying programs in college. Now, when those students would normally be maturing in the job field, there is a stunning lack of experienced and new people to fill those roles.

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Architecture Firm Creates a Lush Oasis in Center of City

With a population of more than twelve million, the city of Sao Paolo, Brazil, is a thriving metropolis with a bustling economy and miles after miles of concrete, asphalt, and steel. But one architecture firm is doing its part to make an oasis deep in the heart of the city.

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hh2 Exhibits at Procore Groundbreak 2018, Previews New Solution

hh2 Cloud Services exhibited at the 2018 Groundbreak conference hosted by Procore Technologies, Inc. in Austin, Texas Nov. 13 - 15. As the provider for the integration between Procore and Sage Group...

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Top Five Growing Jobs in Construction

As the need to fill job openings within the construction industry increases, now is the perfect time for those who are thinking about a career in construction. However, with the industry being so large and there being...

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New $2.5B TSX Broadway Project Meant to Revamp NYC Times Square

New York City’s Times Square is already one of the most exciting places to visit, and with new construction, it is about to rival Las Vegas when it comes to entertainment. Times Square will be ready to start construction...

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The High Life: City Dwellers Prepare for Taller, More Skyscrapers in Coming Years

Ready or not, thousands of new skyscrapers will be built by 2050 according to current trends. City living is continuing to become more and more popular. By 2050, it is estimated that around six billion people will reside...

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Take Control With hh2’s Unit Production Worksheet

If you work in construction, you need to record unit production and percent completes. Don’t waste time waiting for access to a desktop and logging in to your accounting system to record field data. Now, field laborers...

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Home Shortage Continues as Prices Continue to Rise

Finding a home to purchase with a budget of under $250,000 seems close to impossible in today’s housing market. Labor, land and material costs continue to rise, which is resulting in slowing down the production...

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