Posts filtered by tag:

Construction News

View posts
Homebuilders are Looking to High School Seniors to Fill Gaps in Labor Shortage

Even though 20 million people are out of work, there remains a shortage of skilled labor in the construction industry. The demand for houses continues to grow despite the pandemic or perhaps because of it: interest rates are at historic lows, which are making homes in high demand.

Read story
Major Construction Accident Highlights High Crane-Related Fatalities in Texas

On September 16th, two cranes at an Austin, TX, construction site collided. In the accident, 16 workers were injured and taken to local hospitals. None of the injuries are considered critical, but experts say that the incident highlights a significant lapse of workplace safety awareness.

Read story
New Construction Labor Marketplace Gains Silicon Valley Funding

Core, a new app and online site, is designed to connect construction laborers with contractors and builders in need of workers. It has gotten the eye of several influential Silicon Valley investors.

Read story
Construction Industry Holding Steady, Says Index

Despite the many issues that are plaguing 2020, the Marcum Commercial Construction Index for the second quarter reports that the industry is maintaining a relatively even keel. In particular, unemployment in the construction industry has dropped back down to 8.9% after seeing record highs in April and March. The unemployment rate across all sectors is at 10.2%.

Read story
Tradeswomen Want to See More Women in Construction

With the COVID-19 outbreak, an estimated 11.5 million women lost their jobs between February and May. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the worst-hit areas are hospitality, transportation, travel, entertainment, personal services (like daycare and hair salons) and retail. Those industries employ, on average, more women than men.

Read story
Three Technologies that are Improving Construction Fast

Building Information Modeling was a new technology a few years ago that is now a universally accepted staple of the industry. It allows all the stakeholders in a project, from builders and architects to accounts and owners, to look at the process in real-time to see completed work and the challenges looming ahead.

Read story
Pandemic Will Shape the Future of Construction in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is facing tough economic times, and the construction and architecture communities are rallying to see how to address the future of the City of Angels. According to architect Karin Liljegren of Omgivning, an architecture, and design firm, Covid-19 has exposed many deep-rooted problems in Southern California. Among them, the health crisis, the climate crisis, and the racial crisis.

Read story
The Construction Industry is Demanding More Tech Vocations

The construction world has been slow to adapt to new technology but in recent years the boundaries of what is possible continue to be pushed. The problem, experts say, is finding people who are skilled in both the tech world and the construction world. It’s a rare skill set, but it’s becoming increasingly in demand as everything from BIM to robotics to virtual reality devices are pounding on the door of the industry.

Read story
Despite Layoffs, Finding Skilled Labor Remains a Concern

Back before there was wall-to-wall coverage of the Covid-19 epidemic, there were constant reports—even here on this blog—of the inability of contractors and construction companies to find skilled labor. One would think that since the major layoffs occurred in the spring of 2020, more of these positions would be easier to fill. But that is not the case, according to a workforce study from the Associated General Contractors of America and AutoDesk.

Read story
Power Supply for Off-Grid Construction is Moving Zero-Emission

Long a dream of those who are choosing to live and build off the grid, a zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell is now available to supply heat and power. The first major introduction of the new technology is being implemented in the United Kingdom, but will have far reaching effects across the globe.

Read story
Wood Materials in Short Supply Post Covid

There was a confluence of events that caused a shortage in construction materials in 2020: lumber mills and logging operations were shut down as part of the Covid response, there has already been a shortage of truckers who are certified to haul lumber, and people have been stuck and home and therefore buying more at their local Home Depots and Lowes to mend fences, replace roofs, and build sheds. With all three of these things working together, the National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB) announced that the price of lumber has risen nearly 80% since mid-April to more than $600 per thousand board feet. Some places have seen a sheet of plywood go from $15 to $34.

Read story
800 Sick with Covid at Nation’s Only Nuclear Construction Site

Nuclear power plants are few and far between these days as environmental groups have called into question the impact of the nuclear waste disposal, but the only active nuclear construction site in the United States is under investigation for a different kind of sickness: a rapid Covid outbreak.

Read story
Construction Planned for “Space Station of the Sea”

Calling to mind images from The Abyss or 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, undersea adventurer Fabien Cousteau (son of legendary Jacques Cousteau) is planning the Proteus, the first undersea research station to be built in 34 years. Jacques Cousteau, who once lived in an undersea research station as an “oceanaut” for 30 days, dreamed of a day when living and studying under the waves would become commonplace. And new plans may be taking us one step closer to that dream.

Read story
COVID Meets Climate Change as Architecture Turns to Medieval Solutions

Though air conditioners have long been the primary method of keeping cool, Covid-19 has taught us two things: we need more fresh air than we’ve been getting, and recirculated air means recirculated germs. And when we push our air conditioners harder and harder to keep buildings cooler, we’re producing a bigger carbon footprint.

Read story
How COVID is Affecting Individual Sectors

We all know that Covid-19 had a significant impact on the construction sector (though some places weathered the storm better than others), but some sectors of the industry have been harder hit than others. A recent survey from the consulting group Appleseed Strategy highlights where the hard hits have been and where the opportunities are—because it’s not all bad.

Read story
Ten Cities Most Hurt in Construction Sector

A new survey from Dodge Data and Analytics shows ten cities that saw the biggest hit from the coronavirus shutdown, in terms of new construction.

Read story
Construction Starts to Drop 7% in July Led by 31% Drop in Nonbuilding Segment

According to the most recent report from Dodge Data and Analytics, total construction starts for July fell 7%. This sharp drop was led primarily by a 31% dip in the non-building segment. (Nonbuilding consists of industrial, roads, public works, etc.) Nonresidential starts rose 3% and residential dropped 2%.

Read story
3-D Printing Pioneer Has Sights on Texas Neighborhood

Icon, a startup based in Austin, Texas, made news (and an appearance in this blog) last year when it became the first company in the world to 3-D print an entire neighborhood. The project took place in Mexico, creating small two-room homes as part of an affordable housing effort to help the homeless. The $35 million experiment was such a success that the company has raised a further $44 million in funding to bring their work to America.

Read story
New 3D Printing Technology Prepares for Construction—on Mars

In an effort to produce a more carbon-friendly concrete material, Texas A&M University has developed a 3D printing technology that not only has implications for construction here and now, but is thought to be one of the most viable ways to implement construction on Mars.

Read story
European Architect Group Urges Renovation, Not Demolition

In a campaign organized by the European Architect’s Journal and backed by 14 Sterling Prize winners, a new push is being made to get businesses to renovate existing buildings rather than tear them down and rebuild—to fight climate change.

Read story
Texas, a State that has Been Ravaged by COVID, is Leading the Country in Housing Starts

The rest of the United States has taken a 12 percent dip in apartment construction during the first half of the year, and Texas is seeming to be coming through relatively unscathed, according to a survey by RentCafe.

Read story
Mass Transit Construction Sees Turmoil As More People Work From Home

With the lockdowns of COVID and the ensuing conversation about whether working from home or not will remain a more conventional way of doing business. Mass transit projects are taking a funding hit—or at least being highly scrutinized by the backers who are putting up the billions of dollars to fund them. In New York City, for example, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) said that without federal assistance, they face a $16 billion funding gap through 2024.

Read story
Tesla Begins Construction on World’s Largest Battery Bank

Tesla, the company behind the electric cars and the SpaceX launch vehicle that safely sent astronauts to the International Space Station and brought them back safely to earth, is now turning its eye onto the most substantial ever energy storage system, in Moss Landing, California.

Read story
Architecture, Bellwether of Future, is in Flux

The architecture industry, which has long been looked at as a predictor of what the future holds, not just for construction but for the economy at large, is making some exciting moves as it recovers from Covid-19.

Read story
New Startup Claims to Automate 80% of Construction Work

A new company, Mighty Buildings, has quietly been gaining $30 million in funding from a combination of investors, including Khosla Ventures, Y Combinator, SV Angel, CoreVC and more. The company has made the eyebrow-raising claim that it can automate as much as 80% of the construction process.

Read story
“General Economic Malaise” Strikes United States Construction

A new report out from Moody’s Analytics does not paint a rosy picture for the immediate future of America’s real estate and construction sectors. In a year that was supposed to have been record-breaking, real estate projects are estimated to move forward again at a pace that is slower than the recovery after the Great Recession.

Read story
Shooting at Construction Site Highlights Dangers Faced by Workers

A shooting at a Culver City, California, construction site this week shows how dangerous an already dangerous profession can be. Construction, which hosts a number of the most dangerous jobs in the workforce, including carpenters, electricians, plumbers, painters, and more, has always been a risky business. The general laborer is the 17th most dangerous job in America, while roofers are at #4, heavy machine operators are at #8, and steelworkers at #9. (The most dangerous jobs remain in the logging industry.)

Read story
New Construction Technology Buildots Uses Computer Vision

Buildots, a new technology firm, eponymously named after the new invention they’ve created, announced this week that it has raised $16 million in funding.

Read story
Massive Bombing in Beirut Leaves Architecture and Construction Industries Worried

For a country with such a chaotic past, including several recent violent rocket engagements with Israel, Lebanon has had a surprising amount of highly-developed architecture. Add to that the historic nature of the city and its many ancient buildings, and you’ve got a wonderland of architectural design. That could all be gone permanently, however, following this week’s devastating explosion.

Read story
Architecture Firm's Vision of a Manhattan Without Cars

As densely packed as Manhattan is, it might surprise you to learn that 30% of the city's square footage is dedicated to roadways. But according to studies, less than half of New York residents make use of that space, as they don't drive and don't take taxis.

Read story
As Economy Makes Historic Contraction, Construction Spending Plummets

This week the Department of Commerce reported that the economy shrank at the fastest rate ever recorded between April and June—32.9% in the second quarter of 2020. While construction has resumed and many projects are moving forward at the pace they were pre-pandemic, the overall toll that Covid-19 has had on the construction industry has been severe.

Read story
The Architecture Drawing Prize Entries Open

The World Architecture Festival announced on July 22nd the new Architecture Drawing Prize call for submissions. The prize, which was new in 2017, celebrates the skill and innovation of architectural drawing, both by hand, by computer, and hybrid drawing. The point of the award is to honor the way that architectural drawings—not necessarily blueprints, but all forms of architectural drawing, including elevations, artists’ renderings, re-imaginings, cutaways, perspective views, and anything related—influence the world of architecture, construction and art.

Read story
UCLA Gets Grant to Convert CO2 Into Concrete

Gaurav Sant, a professor at UCLA and director of UCLA’s Institute for Carbon Management, is overseeing a project to convert carbon dioxide emissions into building materials. The project just received a $2 million, two-year grant from the US Department of Energy.

Read story
New York Contractor to Pay $1.5 Million in Harassment Settlement

In a suit that is making waves across both the New York construction landscape, but also across the country, a New York construction contractor, Trade Off LLC, has to pay 18 women $1.5 million in a settlement of a case that the New York Attorney General called "severe" sexual harassment.

Read story
Unexploded WW2 Ordnance Found by Construction Crew in DC

Construction workers got more than they bargained for this week while doing routine construction work on a park in Washington DC—they discovered an undetonated World War 2 era bomb.

Read story
American Institute of Architects Reports Nonresidential Construction to Decline

According to a new report from the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the decrease in construction spending that began with the pandemic is likely to continue well into 2021. Among all construction sectors, the commercial sector (which includes office, retail and hotels) will be the hardest hit, with spending projected to decline 12% this year and 8% more in 2021, according to the AIA Consensus Construction Forecast.

Read story
Construction Workers Prone to Risky Behaviors, Study Says

We talk all the time about dangers on the jobsite—and there are many—but a new study from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) suggests that it may be during the off-the-clock time that construction workers are at more serious risk of injury or illness. And the behaviors don’t just apply to workers, but to construction management as well.

Read story
New York City Shuts Down 41 Construction Areas for COVID-19

New York City’s Department of Buildings (DOB) has begun enforcing new stricter safety guidelines related to the novel coronavirus, and in the first five days they issued 88 citations and 41 stop work orders.

Read story
US Housing Construction Jumps 17.3% Post-Reopening

As the economy reopened for most states in June, there was a 17.3% upswing in housing construction, but the total production is still lower than it was before the lockdown.

Read story
How Diseases Shaped Architecture in the Past

An in-depth article in The New Yorker last month described the history of modern architecture and came to the conclusion that much of what we view as “modern sensibilities” can be traced back to the tuberculosis epidemic of the early 20th century. Specifically, a groundbreaker was the 1933 Paimio Sanitorium, a hospice for tuberculosis patients in Finland, designed by Hugo Alvar Henrik Aalto, was a big shift away from the 1920s and 1910s. What had been the norm: dark buildings lit with lamps and fires, covered with fabrics and draperies, was all gone. The new sanitorium was “rigidly geometric, with long walls of expansive windows wrapping its façade, light-colored rooms, and a wide roof terrace with railings like the ones on cruise ships—all the hallmarks of what we now know as modernist architecture.” In fact, this rigid geometric shape and long expansive windows can describe just about every skyscraper being built for the last seventy years, in true Bauhaus tradition.

Read story
Is Architecture the Canary in the Coal Mine?

We’ve heard conflicting reports over the past several months—sometimes the forecast is dire and other times it’s positive. But one area where there is definite suffering is in the architecture sector, which many consultants believe is the proverbial canary in the coalmine of construction: after all, if architects have nothing to design, then what is there to build?

Read story
Two Construction Stocks Get Upgraded by Wall Street, But See Small Gains

Caterpillar, a stock that has been struggling for several quarters, was upgraded by forecasters and grading agencies on Wednesday, but that didn’t lead to much in trading shares. According to Barron’s, investors seem to have left construction equipment companies for dead.

Read story
Woman Hired to Solve Construction Embezzlement Gets Arrested for Embezzlement

Construction company No Limits Construction might need to revisit their hiring practices and do some more background checking on their new employees.

Read story
The “Next Normal of Construction”?

According to business consultancy group McKinsey & Co, the construction industry will radically change as it undergoes nine shifts caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The report, The Next Normal of Construction, explains how “disruption is reshaping the world’s largest ecosystem.”

Read story
Three Keys to Technology Adoption in Construction

A 2018 study from Fails Management Institute (FMI), a management consultancy group, reported that 55% of engineering and construction firms were “actively seeking new technology solutions.” But at the same time, a 2019 study from Dodge Data and Analytics found that 90% of the contractors surveyed “do not specifically budget for innovation.”

Read story
Commercial Construction Index Takes Big Hit

The USG and U.S. Chamber of Commerce Commercial Construction Index, a gauge for the outlook and confidence in the commercial construction industry, dropped massively from 74 in Q1 to 56 in Q2. The reason for the dive is that two of the index’s three main indicators—confidence in new business and revenue expectations—both fell 26 points, to 50 and 44, respectively. The third indicator, backlog, dropped 3 points, to 73.

Read story
World’s Tallest Mass Timber Building to be Built in Australia

Australian software company Atlassian is putting its new headquarters in a mass timber and steel 40-story building, which will be the world’s tallest “hybrid tower.”

Read story
3 Architecture Firms Proposing New COVID Testing Units

Despite all the re-openings of the economy and the lifted restrictions, COVID is still with us, and testing continues to speed up, not slow down. But testing is in so much demand, especially in hard hit states like Arizona and Texas, where lines for drive-thru testing can be hours long, that many are looking for alternative testing sites.

Read story
Deaths, Injuries This Week Remind of Construction Dangers

It has been a deadly week around the United States in the construction industry, with several deaths, injuries and near-misses. It is a reminder to the construction world of the dangers that face workers every day as they go on the job site.

Read story
U.S. Home Construction Rebounds 4.3% in May

U.S. home construction rebounded 4.3 per cent in May after steep declines caused by shutdowns due to the coronavirus.

Read story
COVID-19 Side Effect: Severe Lumber Shortage

While construction was considered an essential service in much of the country during the heart of the lockdown, many factories were shuttered, as the disease spreads so quickly and dangerously through factory workers side-by-side during long shifts, often sweating and breathing hard. (See the massive shutdowns in meat processing plants for more examples.)

Read story
Good Construction vs. Good Social Media: Building in the Era of Instagram

ArchDaily recently tackled a topic that may seem odd at first, but which they make a solid case for, providing a surprising amount of evidence to deal with: architecture and construction are being driven not just by form or function but by photographability, to accommodate the culture of Instagram and Pinterest.

Read story
“LinkedIn of Construction” Raises $3.2 Million

Trade Hounds, an app which has the goal of being “the LinkedIn of the construction industry” has raised $3.2 million in seed funding.

Read story
COVID Speeds Up Construction’s Tech Transformation

The COVID pandemic, which to date has infected 2,000,000 Americans and killed 112,000, has slowed in many areas, which has led to many economies opening—some faster than others. But what all areas have seen over recent months is that for construction to continue, even post-coronavirus, technology will need to be a much bigger factor in the construction industry.

Read story
Report Reveals Construction Disputes on the Rise

A study, “Global Construction Disputes Report 2020: Collaborating to Achieve Project Excellence,” was recently released by US-based Arcadis, and reports that construction disputes in North America are increasing, both in quantity and dollar amount, but declining globally. The report also suggests that we’re likely to see a sharp rise in post-COVID disputes, especially in regards to timeframes and deadlines.

Read story
U.S. Court Reject AFL-CIO Bid for OSHA COVID Protections

The AFL-CIO (American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations) the largest organization of unions in the United States, filed a lawsuit with OSHA to create an emergency workplace safety rule based on the coronavirus pandemic.

Read story
New York Opens Many Construction Jobs Again Post-COVID

In the first step of reopening the construction in New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio said on June 5th that he would allow 32,000 construction sites to reopen.

Read story
New Report Suggests Multifamily Suburban Housing Could Be On the Rise

According to a report from Moody’s Analytics, many people are considering moving out of large population centers as they have seen areas like New York and New Jersey—with very high density populations—get much sicker from the novel coronavirus. The report suggests people will be moving away from Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago, and to smaller towns like Madison, Wisconsin and Durham, North Carolina.

Read story
Trump Administration is Easing Up on Construction Regulations

The Trump administration has decided to ease enforcement of environmental regulations covering some industries to help them cope with impacts from the coronavirus outbreak, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said on Thursday.

Read story
Mammoth Skeletons Found in Mexico City Airport Construction

When excavating in Mexico City, it’s not uncommon to find uncommon things. The city is built on the ruins of the Aztec capital of Tenochitlan, and that was built on top of even more ancient cultures before it. So when digging, you can be sure to find something. But at the Mexican capitol’s new airport development, construction workers found something they didn’t expect: two huge skulls, along with scattered ribs and limbs.

Read story
Construction Like “A Rocket About to Take Off”

In an interview with construction website Construction Dive, Chuck Goodrich, CEO and president of the Indianapolis-based Gaylor Electric, which works in 27 different US states, says that not all is doom and gloom in the future of construction, as some have been predicting.

Read story
Architecture for Emergencies: Is Pre-Fab Better, or On-Site?

While damage control and preparation is becoming an increasingly important factor in planning our cities, certain extraordinary circumstances are something we can’t plan for but which require quick architectural responses that offer aid to those affected—and often the difference is life and death.

Read story
China Bans “Copycat Architecture” and Supertall Skyscrapers

A new policy, put forward by the Chinese government’s Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development, has decreed that so-called “copycat architecture” or architecture plagiarism is strictly prohibited. It also severely limits the height of skyscrapers.

Read story
It May Take Years for Economy to Recover, ABC Economist Says

Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) Chief Economist Anirban Basu said that it will likely take years for the nation’s economy to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic’s blow.

Read story
Construction Loses Nearly One Million Jobs in April

According to a survey by the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) and drawing date from construction technology firm Procore, the US construction industry shed nearly a million jobs in the last month.

Read story
UK Report Says that Construction Workers at Among Most at Risk for Virus

Low-skilled construction workers in the U.K., urged back to work by Prime Minister Boris Johnson, have one of the highest rates of death from the virus.

Read story
How Tech Solutions Can Help Construction Overcome COVID Losses

COVID-19 has led to substantial losses in nearly all industries, and construction is no exception. When the outbreak subsides, economic recovery will most likely be an elongated process. To shorten this period as much as possible, companies will need to take advantage of new construction technologies.

Read story
8 Ways COVID-19 is Changing the Jobsite

The construction magazine Construction Dive took an in-depth look at what is coming down the pipeline for jobsites in a post-coronavirus world. It listed eight things that it said will changing in coming months and years—some of which will be temporary but some of which will be permanent.

Read story
Construction Begins on World’s Largest Soccer Stadium

Even as America is reeling from COVID-19 and wonder about the future of sports—both in the short and long term—as we come to struggle with the future where social distancing, masks, and large gatherings are all questions on the tips of our tongues, a $1.7 billion soccer stadium is being constructed in China. When completed—estimated to be in 2022—it will be the largest soccer stadium in the world, including 100,000 seats and 162 boxes.

Read story
Using Architecture to Fight a Pandemic

In 2006, in Tugela Ferry, South Africa, an extremely virulent, drug-resistant strain of tuberculosis raged through a hospital—and the building was partially to blame. The hospital was not designed for infection control. The transmission of the disease was through particles suspended in the air, inhaled by patients in a poorly ventilated building with overcrowded waiting areas.

Read story
AIA Points to Major Downturn in Commercial Construction

According to the American Institute of Architects, the demand for design services saw its biggest plunge in recorded history in the month of March. Billings at architecture firms dropped 20.1 points to 33.3, the largest single-month decline in the 25 years that the Institute has been keeping track. By comparison, in the 2001 recession there was a 9.4 decline, and in 2008 an 8.3 decline.

Read story
Virus Stops Construction at Disney, but Universal Soldiers On

In Orlando, Florida, the center of theme park and resort entertainment for half the country, there has been observed activity in the construction of Universal Orlando Resort, but Disneyworld and its adjoining parks, hotels and resorts remained shuttered.

Read story
One of the Greenest Buildings in the World on Showcase

Opened in 2014, One Central Park in Sydney Australia looks at first like a building overrun, the ruin of a high rise that has been overgrown in some future apocalypse. A park at the foot of the building literally continues all the way up the structure, as vegetation from more than 250 different plants and flowers cover the building. They look pretty, provide shade, and send a statement: this building is sustainable.

Read story
Software Companies are Finding Tech Solutions for Social Distancing

While construction continues in many states, social distancing is remaining a rule on worksites, and it often makes things difficult for workers to move around the building—and especially difficult for site managers to patrol them and make sure they’re following the rules. And not following the rules could, in many areas, land them heavy fines.

Read story
Construction Industry Feels Hit In Residential and Commercial Projects

US homebuilder sentiment in April dipped to its lowest level in over seven years, the steepest decline in the 30-year history of the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index.

Read story
Construction Companies Giving Back

Kansas-based construction company Hutton Construction isn’t letting the downturn in projects stop them from working—they’re trading their hammers and nails for masks and gloves, and they’ve gone down to the local food bank to make a difference. Employees and their families are packaging meals for the Outreach Program, a 17-year-old food service foundation based out of Union, Iowa.

Read story
Construction Halted on Notre Dame Cathedral

It was one year ago this week that the news raced around the world: the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, which has stood for 860 years, was engulfed in flame. And though fortunately no lives were lost in the fire, which was either caused by a cigarette or a faulty wire, and the stained-glass windows and main structure of the building remained intact, the spire and roof collapsed. The wood roof, known as the “the forest” for its many heavy, ancient wooden beams, were destroyed, along with the lead roof, and a 350-ton mass of scaffolding that was around the structure as part of a restoration project.

Read story
Post-Pandemic Architecture

We’re already seeing semi-permanent changes being made to stores and gas stations: plastic barricades are going up to protect cashiers from the breath of customers and yellow lines are painted in parking lots to mark where queues should form to wait their turn to enter the store. It’s likely that we’ll see many more innovations in the coming months and years as we learn from this pandemic how to curtail future ones. But this isn’t the first time that architecture has changed radically because of mass sickness and disease. Just as COVID-19 is changing modern structures, 18th century tuberculosis, 19th century cholera, and 20th century Spanish flu forever altered the way architecture is used in cities.

Read story
New York City—COVID’s Epicenter—Moves Forward with Construction

After saying that all construction workers were essential in the time of crisis, the city of New York (which, at the time of writing, has seen more than 7,000 deaths from COVID-19) has eased off of that decision and has taken a much more cautious approach—one that is hurting the construction business.

Read story
Construction—Formerly “Essential Workers”—Is Taking a Hit

It seems incredible to think that we’ve been writing for years about a shortage of skilled labor in construction, with companies desperate to find and secure new employees. But now, in just a few months, we’ve seen a remarkable number of construction companies furlough or lay off workers.

Read story
Architecture Firms are Feeling the Pinch, Which Forecasts Trouble Ahead

Even though construction is still mostly operating at capacity, architectural firms—particularly those that work on public works projects—are getting squeezed by the poor economy, and that predicts few construction projects down the pipeline.

Read story
Quarantined Populace? Time to Fix the Streets!

With more than 90% of the country under stay-at-home orders, the streets have been eerily quiet. Of course, there is still the traffic of essential workers, and the trips to the grocery store and pharmacy, but traffic is demonstrably low right now.

Read story
Coming “Post-Coronavirus Construction Tsunami”

While there are many stories of doom and gloom, especially around the economy, there are glimmers of hope. One in particular came from Keith Prather, a market intelligence expert for the business management consulting firm Pioneer IQ. They developed something called the “Fear and Recovery Curve” model to indicate when the crisis would end and what the recovery would look like. And the future, Prather says, is rosy.

Read story
Pandemic Architecture: International Ideas Competition

ArchDaily is sponsoring a design competition for designing a city in post-pandemic times—specifically, urban designs. We’ve seen all too well, from Italy to China to New York City, how a tightly-packed population can spread disease rapidly to devastating effect. It is with this in mind that the Pandemic Architecture Competition is being held to look for innovative new designs that manage to house many people while keeping them safe.

Read story
Everything Old is New Again: Architectural Lessons About COVID

COVID-19 has changed the country irrevocably and the fallout will last for decades if not centuries. There is no way to foretell all the many ways that the world will be different because of the pandemic, but some architects are looking to past styles when thinking about future construction. Everything old is new again.

Read story
The Zoom of Construction Work?

Many entire industries are sheltering in place and working from home, but construction is one sector that is often referred to as ‘essential’, meaning that the workers have to continue on the job and do their best to maintain social distance. But new technology is right around the corner that may put workers at home, behind a desk.

Read story
Architecture Firms Lobby for Stimulus Relief

In a letter addressed to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the American Institute of Architects asked for improved aid, including loans and tax breaks, to help architecture firms amid the economic downturn caused by COVID-19.

Read story
Construction Is Continuing as an Essential Service—But Not Everyone Agrees

With a third of the United States on lockdown, including the three largest cities (New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago), something is continuing unabated—construction. In California, Governor Gavin Newsom labeled construction as an “essential service” alongside things like healthcare and food service. And while some construction projects are easily labeled as essential—things like road repair, and maintenance of water and transit infrastructure, it may be hard to understand what is so essential about the construction of housing or commercial projects.

Read story
Italian Architecture Firm Designs ICU That Can Fit in a Shipping Crate

Italy has been the country hit the hardest by the coronavirus, seeing an almost 9% death rate (more than 8,000 deaths as of March 27th), and the country is struggling to handle the massive need for hospital space. That’s why the architecture firm Carlo Ratti Associati designed an intensive care unit that can be easily packaged and sent to areas in need.

Read story
How COVID-19 Will Change Architecture

It’s hard not to pay attention to the environment around you during this massive health crisis, whether you’re weathering out the storm at work or working from home (or, worse, laid off). Many people are using their quarantined time to disinfect, clean, and organize, and it has caused many people to reevaluate the spaces they live in and the spaces they hope to return to soon, including public spaces such as hospitals, airports, gyms, offices, and hotels.

Read story
Emergency Construction of Temporary Field Hospital Underway in Washington

Construction on a temporary field hospital started on Wednesday on a Shoreline soccer field near Seattle, Washington. As of March 19th, Washington had over 1300 cases of the virus, one of the hardest-hit states in the country.

Read story
Construction Companies Doing Their Part to Help Hospital Workers

All across the nation there has been a dramatic shortage in several essential items, but one in particular is protective masks. While hospitals have masks in storage for their needs, the coronavirus pandemic has all but depleted their stores of the precious safety equipment—and they haven’t been helped by the members of the panicked public who bought through Amazon, and other online retailers’, stocks in a matter of hours. This has left emergency workers scrambling to find masks, with some nurses and doctors resorting to using bandannas and strips of cloth.

Read story
California’s Strictest-Yet Quarantine Order Does Not Apply to Some Construction

The massive stay-at-home order issued by Governor Gavin Newsom of California, which restricts 40 million people to their home except for emergency trips to the store, the gas station, or the doctor, does not appear to affect the construction industry. Although it was not mentioned specifically in the executive order issued March 19th, a notice on the government’s website lists construction as one of the sectors not affected.

Read story
5 Ways the Coronavirus Will Affect Construction

Steve Lesser, the chair of Becker’s Construction law practice, says the key words right now are “Wait and see.”

Read story
Coronavirus Didn’t Slow Down ConExpo, Largest Construction Convention in North America

Last week ConExpo went ahead as planned in Las Vegas, bringing in 130,000 attendees to the once-every-three-years event. The expo takes up 2.7 million square feet of space and is truly staggering in its scope. Taking place on March 10, before most travel bans and mass closures were instituted, the expo move forward on schedule.

Read story
Two Men Sentenced in Architecture Forgery Scheme

Two California men were sentenced to one year in jail and five years probation after they were convicted of more than 200 counts of forgery in an architecture and engineering scheme.

Read story
How to Hire and Retain Women in the Construction Workforce

Sunday, March 8th, is International Women’s Day, a day that does not celebrate the superiority of women to men, but the importance of gender equality in the workforce and society. But that equality in the construction field is lacking. Women make up 50% of the U.S. labor force, but only 10% of the construction industry.

Read story
The Umbrella Method to Building Bridges

A new kind of bridge manufacturing method, nicknamed the umbrella method, has been introduced in Germany, and it promises an entirely new, revolutionary way to span bridges without extensive scaffolding.

Read story
Tiny Home Village Finally Under Construction

After years of delays really to zoning regulations and community concerns, a small, 30-home experiment is being built in Albuquerque.

Read story
Procore Technologies Files for IPO with SEC

Project management software giant Procore Technologies Inc has held its cards close to its chest in the decision to go public, but last Friday the answer came forth loud and clear as the company filed the paperwork with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) announcing its plans for an initial public offering (IPO). No date for the IPO has been set, but they say it will happen in the “near future”.

Read story

Discover Categories

Want to discover the complete PowerTools blog?
Visit Blog