Posts filtered by tag:

Architecture

View posts
Bamboo Still has a Central Role to Play in Construction

A material that has been used for millennia in construction doesn’t show any signs of stopping being useful in the modern era. Used for everything from scaffolding to bridges to waterways to entire buildings, bamboo has been used in Asia and South America for thousands of years. It has many benefits, not the least of which are that it’s very strong, very flexible, and grows extremely quickly.

Read story
Architecture for Emergencies: Is Pre-Fab Better, or On-Site?

While damage control and preparation is becoming an increasingly important factor in planning our cities, certain extraordinary circumstances are something we can’t plan for but which require quick architectural responses that offer aid to those affected—and often the difference is life and death.

Read story
China Bans “Copycat Architecture” and Supertall Skyscrapers

A new policy, put forward by the Chinese government’s Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development, has decreed that so-called “copycat architecture” or architecture plagiarism is strictly prohibited. It also severely limits the height of skyscrapers.

Read story
Evolo Magazine Names Healthcare Emergency Skyscraper First Place

In the annual Evolo design competition, this year focused on skyscrapers, the magazine made a timely decision to name the Epidemic Babel the 2020 winner. The skyscraper, which is designed by Chinese architects in response to the COVID-19 crisis, is designed to be built at a moment’s notice at the site of an outbreak—a kind of pop-up hospital that can take mass casualties.

Read story
8 Ways COVID-19 is Changing the Jobsite

The construction magazine Construction Dive took an in-depth look at what is coming down the pipeline for jobsites in a post-coronavirus world. It listed eight things that it said will changing in coming months and years—some of which will be temporary but some of which will be permanent.

Read story
Construction Begins on World’s Largest Soccer Stadium

Even as America is reeling from COVID-19 and wonder about the future of sports—both in the short and long term—as we come to struggle with the future where social distancing, masks, and large gatherings are all questions on the tips of our tongues, a $1.7 billion soccer stadium is being constructed in China. When completed—estimated to be in 2022—it will be the largest soccer stadium in the world, including 100,000 seats and 162 boxes.

Read story
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Homes Opened for Virtual Tours

Frank Lloyd Wright is undeniably the grandfather of architecture in America, considered by many to be America’s best and most influential ever. Architects, builders, and even just art lovers travel to see his buildings like a pilgrimage, and many of even his lesser-known works have been turned into small museums dedicated to him and his Prairie Style.

Read story
Using Architecture to Fight a Pandemic

In 2006, in Tugela Ferry, South Africa, an extremely virulent, drug-resistant strain of tuberculosis raged through a hospital—and the building was partially to blame. The hospital was not designed for infection control. The transmission of the disease was through particles suspended in the air, inhaled by patients in a poorly ventilated building with overcrowded waiting areas.

Read story
One of the Greenest Buildings in the World on Showcase

Opened in 2014, One Central Park in Sydney Australia looks at first like a building overrun, the ruin of a high rise that has been overgrown in some future apocalypse. A park at the foot of the building literally continues all the way up the structure, as vegetation from more than 250 different plants and flowers cover the building. They look pretty, provide shade, and send a statement: this building is sustainable.

Read story
Construction Halted on Notre Dame Cathedral

It was one year ago this week that the news raced around the world: the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, which has stood for 860 years, was engulfed in flame. And though fortunately no lives were lost in the fire, which was either caused by a cigarette or a faulty wire, and the stained-glass windows and main structure of the building remained intact, the spire and roof collapsed. The wood roof, known as the “the forest” for its many heavy, ancient wooden beams, were destroyed, along with the lead roof, and a 350-ton mass of scaffolding that was around the structure as part of a restoration project.

Read story
Post-Pandemic Architecture

We’re already seeing semi-permanent changes being made to stores and gas stations: plastic barricades are going up to protect cashiers from the breath of customers and yellow lines are painted in parking lots to mark where queues should form to wait their turn to enter the store. It’s likely that we’ll see many more innovations in the coming months and years as we learn from this pandemic how to curtail future ones. But this isn’t the first time that architecture has changed radically because of mass sickness and disease. Just as COVID-19 is changing modern structures, 18th century tuberculosis, 19th century cholera, and 20th century Spanish flu forever altered the way architecture is used in cities.

Read story
Architecture Firms are Feeling the Pinch, Which Forecasts Trouble Ahead

Even though construction is still mostly operating at capacity, architectural firms—particularly those that work on public works projects—are getting squeezed by the poor economy, and that predicts few construction projects down the pipeline.

Read story
Pandemic Architecture: International Ideas Competition

ArchDaily is sponsoring a design competition for designing a city in post-pandemic times—specifically, urban designs. We’ve seen all too well, from Italy to China to New York City, how a tightly-packed population can spread disease rapidly to devastating effect. It is with this in mind that the Pandemic Architecture Competition is being held to look for innovative new designs that manage to house many people while keeping them safe.

Read story
Everything Old is New Again: Architectural Lessons About COVID

COVID-19 has changed the country irrevocably and the fallout will last for decades if not centuries. There is no way to foretell all the many ways that the world will be different because of the pandemic, but some architects are looking to past styles when thinking about future construction. Everything old is new again.

Read story
Architecture Firms Lobby for Stimulus Relief

In a letter addressed to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the American Institute of Architects asked for improved aid, including loans and tax breaks, to help architecture firms amid the economic downturn caused by COVID-19.

Read story
Italian Architecture Firm Designs ICU That Can Fit in a Shipping Crate

Italy has been the country hit the hardest by the coronavirus, seeing an almost 9% death rate (more than 8,000 deaths as of March 27th), and the country is struggling to handle the massive need for hospital space. That’s why the architecture firm Carlo Ratti Associati designed an intensive care unit that can be easily packaged and sent to areas in need.

Read story
How COVID-19 Will Change Architecture

It’s hard not to pay attention to the environment around you during this massive health crisis, whether you’re weathering out the storm at work or working from home (or, worse, laid off). Many people are using their quarantined time to disinfect, clean, and organize, and it has caused many people to reevaluate the spaces they live in and the spaces they hope to return to soon, including public spaces such as hospitals, airports, gyms, offices, and hotels.

Read story
World’s Tallest Wooden Skyscraper Built in Rural Norway

In a town of 10,000 people, surrounded by farmland, is not where you’d expect to see the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper. But in the Norwegian town of Brumunddal, about 100 kilometers north of Oslo, you’ll find just that.

Read story
Two Men Sentenced in Architecture Forgery Scheme

Two California men were sentenced to one year in jail and five years probation after they were convicted of more than 200 counts of forgery in an architecture and engineering scheme.

Read story
Tiny Home Village Finally Under Construction

After years of delays really to zoning regulations and community concerns, a small, 30-home experiment is being built in Albuquerque.

Read story
The Future of Architecture is Post-Industrial

In the 1960’s there was the so-called “white flight” movement, which drove middle-class Americans to the suburbs and left cities for the poor. New York City, famously, was denied federal bailouts in 1975 and spiraled into chaos and crime.

Read story
How the Brain Responds to Architecture

We all know that we respond emotionally to architecture. The style and quality of a building can brighten moods, put people at ease, or depress and cause anxiety. But recently research psychiatrists have been studying the effects of architecture on the mind, and the results are intriguing.

Read story
How the Dutch Use Architecture

If you were to guess which country on earth had the highest agriculture exports, you’d probably pick the United States, and you’d be right. But if you were to pick second place? Would it be Canada, with its vast land area? China, with their bustling export business? It would have to be a big country, wouldn’t it? Known for cutting edge technology?

Read story
What is Classical Architecture and Why Is There an Uproar?

In recent weeks, the architecture community has been in a tizzy over a document that was released from the Whitehouse entitled “Making Federal Buildings Great Again.” As can be guessed from the title alone, the proposal was presented by the Trump administration, and it was controversial. But what does it all mean and why is there a controversy at all?

Read story
Multifamily Construction Starts Rose Just 1% Last Year

According to the National Association of Home Builders, despite increasing demand for multifamily properties, construction starts rose just 1% to 381,000 and are expected to increase just 1% more to 383,000 in 2020, though an increase of 4% is expected in 2021.

Read story
Is Fungus the Future of Sustainable Building?

On this blog we’ve covered the topic of sustainable construction and the carbon footprint of buildings before, to the point where it may seem like a broken record. But a new technology has turned the sustainable construction field on its head: fungus.

Read story
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Architecture School Closing After 88 Years

The school of Architecture at Taliesin will shut its doors in June after 88 years producing some of the greatest architects in America. The school was founded nearly 90 years ago by arguably the greatest architect in American history, the man behind Falling Water, the Guggenheim, and hundreds of other Prairie-Style homes and buildings around the world.

Read story
Architecture Produces Reality, Says Danish Architect

"The Danish meaning of architecture is the art of building," Bjarke Ingels said. "I think, unlike the art that is displayed in a museum or in a gallery, is that architecture is more representational. What defines architecture is that it actually produces reality."

Read story
The Case for “Dumb” Cities

High-tech “smart cities” are becoming all the rage over the last twenty years, but there is currently pushback on many fronts saying that what we need are “dumber” cities—ditching the data and embracing the lessons learned over the past millennia.

Read story
Urban Planning is Changing as the World Urbanizes

By 2050, 68% of the world’s population is expected to live in cities. The biggest cities—known as megacities—are almost hard to comprehend: Tokyo is the biggest at 37 million people, followed by Dehli at 29 million and Shanghai at 26 million. It’s enough to make the United States’ largest city, New York City at 8.3 million, look quaint.

Read story
New Armatron Systems 3D Printer Can Produce 60-foot-long Slab of Concrete in a Minute

Armatron Systems, an Arizona-based 3D Construction company has secured a patent for an on-site printer that officials say can create a 60-foot-long slab of concrete in less than a minute—and not just lay the concrete, but set the concrete, so it can bear weight. This rapid slip-form mold extrusion process limits bubbles and air in the concrete which shortens the curing time, which allows not just for long slabs, but curvilinear forms as well.

Read story
Tragic Fire Reveals Secrets into Medieval Architecture

In April of 2019, an electrical fire in the roof of the Notre Dame de Paris, a cathedral that has stood as a national and international landmark for 850 years, sparked a blaze that tore through the ceiling beams and partially collapsed the roof. However much a tragedy, architects are turning lemons into lemonade by using the reconstruction process to determine just how, exactly, the magnificent cathedral was built and stood so solidly for so many centuries.

Read story
Ringing In The New Year With New Designs

There are many shake ups in the world of architecture in the last year. Africa’s tallest building was completed. Europe’s first underwater restaurant launched. Architects and regular citizens alike watched in horror as the Notre Dame de Paris burned.

Read story
Lord of the Rings Hobbit House Being Built for AirBnB

"In a hole in the ground there lived a Hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a Hobbit-hole, and that means comfort." –J.R.R. Tolkien

Read story
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: More than Just a Slogan

A slogan that we heard as kids in school has entered a more professional lexicon: the world of architecture. Yes, architecture has long been about trying to be more sustainable and there have been some extreme cases of recycling products to build modern structure, but now it’s taking on a whole new meaning as modern architects increasingly look for ways to make their buildings environmentally friendly, cheaper, and even more beautiful.

Read story
A New Generation of Stadium

Competitive video games are growing like crazy around the world, particularly in East Asia, but now the first ever free-standing esports arena is being built in the Western Hemisphere, set to house the Overwatch League of the Philadelphia Fusion, with a target start date of 2021.

Read story
Brick-Laying Robots Are Building Upon Their Predecessors

In an age where construction robotics are the next new thing on the horizon, it might surprise you to learn that the first brick-laying robot was designed and featured in 1967. Claimed to be able to lay bricks five to ten times faster than the tradition by-hand method, it claimed to be the idea of the future. Attached by rail to a wall, the Motor Mason was an intriguing experiment, but ultimately a flash in the pan.

Read story
Hostile Architecture: Keeping the Public Out of Public Spaces

We’ve all seen it, though we may not have realized what we’re looking at: there are fixtures all over a city that are designed to keep people from being comfortable. And there’s a movement underway to return these public spaces to the public.

Read story
Some of the World’s Scariest Buildings

From museums to houses to office buildings, these structures are designed to not only serve their function but to surprise, intimidate, and even scare.

Read story
Architects are Becoming the New Psychiatrists

It’s an old axiom in business that you must understand the minds of your employees, but that is being taken to the next level in architecture, where architects are being forced to envision a world of the future.

Read story
Living Walls are Becoming More Prominent in Urban Areas

Gone are the days when a “green” building was merely covered in creeping vines. In a new trend that is part of both urban beautification and environmentalism, “living walls” are appearing all across downtown areas in the United States and abroad.

Read story
Five Ted Talks that For Construction and Design Professionals

Stunning buildings made from raw, imperfect materials

Read story
House Built by Robots and Digital Fabrication Could Change Everything

A new house built in Switzerland, designed by the ETH Zurich University, could be one of the first steps in a construction revolution. The DFAB house (digital fabrication) was developed by the university and two dozen partners as part of the Next Evolution in Sustainable Technologies (NEST)project.

Read story
Are Pre-Fab “Lego” Houses the Solution to the Housing Crisis?

Not much has changed in the home construction industry in the last fifty years. Workers show up to a site, dig, pour, frame, sheath, and finish a house, with a nationwide average cost of $428,000 a piece. And that’s when there’s proper space to find that jobsite and enough skilled laborers to do the work.

Read story
Could “Tall Wood” Buildings Be the Future of High Rises?

In what may seem counter-intuitive to progress, there is a global resurgence of so-called “tall wood” buildings, which are defined as structures that are made primarily from timber framing and are more than fourteen stories or fifty meters tall.

Read story
Uprooting Green Space Can Have Decades of Impact

We’ve all seen a construction project tear up existing grass, trees, shrubs and earth—temporarily, to be replanted and “restored” later. But what impact does the temporary disruption really have on the landscape, fauna, and human usage?

Read story
Growing Up Instead of Out

As cities grow, it’s inevitable that they must begin to increase in density. Urban sprawl will always exist, but city centers grow, and there’s only one direction for a downtown to grow: up. As they grow up instead of out, they’re faced with many positives and negatives. This is healthy and positive. Growth in a city is good. But the question of whether you’re growing in the right ways is important for a building planner to consider. Here are a few pluses and minuses to increasing density:

Read story
Universal Access to Parks and Plazas

Parks and plazas are designed as gathering places for communities, meant to enrich lives and cultural experience, but recent studies show that that is not the case. While the elderly make up 20% of the population, only 4% of park users are elderly. The problem, according to one study, is accessibility.

Read story
A Gentler Way to Gentrify

Developers in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bushwick do not like to be called “developers”. The word is loaded with a lot of negative public connotations, not the least of which is the dreaded term of “gentrification.” Instead, the real estate developer Venn prefers the term “impact developer”, a developer that is concerned about the quality of life in the communities and towns in which they operate. Gentrification has been associated with higher rents and hipster classifications, and Venn wants to avoid that. It doesn’t even refer to its residents as residents, but as Venners, or members.

Read story
Modular Construction Business Booming

According to the Commercial Construction Index, demand for modular construction is increasing, and industry insiders see it as a major growth area.

Read story
2020 Olympic Venues Nearing Completion

Tokyo 2020 Olympic organizers have released a report outlining their readiness for the Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. According to the report, more than half of all venues have been completed with just a year to go.

Read story
Construction Worker Saves Children From Fire

At a burning apartment complex in Albuquerque, New Mexico, a father had to lean out a window and drop his 2-month-old baby into the arms of a rescuing construction worker. The father was trapped on the second floor. Seconds later, the worker caught and saved a toddler as well.

Read story
Widespread Beliefs About US Infrastructure Spending May Be Unfounded

It is a fact that much of the United States infrastructure is deteriorating rapidly, but the commonly held belief that our spending on such infrastructure has dramatically decreased does not appear to be upheld by the evidence, according to a new report from the Brookings Institute.

Read story
Modern Architecture on the Cutting Edge

With all the talk of modernizing the industry, it’s also important to take a look at the amazing new innovations that are coming out of modern architecture. Here are some of the greatest new buildings that have flown under the radar. And many of these aren’t in grand operahouses or libraries, but are in quiet, utilitarian uses.

Read story
Antarctic Construction Project Estimated to Cost $250 Million

In what is expected to be harsh conditions, a New Zealand construction company is undertaking a $250 million development on the Scott Base of Antarctica. The 10,000 square foot base, comprising three buildings, is expected to house 100 personnel against the freezing temperatures.

Read story
Researchers Are Recycling Glass into Concrete

In search of new ways to reuse non-recyclable glass, scientists have found a simple answer: they’re turning glass back into sand.

Read story
How to Choose the Right Glass for Your Project

With such rapid advances in technology, the options for something as basic as glass are no longer simple. There are extensive selections to choose from when building your project, and your purpose, geography, and usage play an essential role.

Read story
McKinsey Reports on Government’s Role in Implementing Technology Changes in Construction

While new technologies emerge everyday that could help the construction industry—technology that generated $15-$18 billion in the last five years—it has been found that such technologies are often underused or...

Read story
Case Study: NEI General Contracting Improves Quality and Consistency of Payroll with hh2 Cloud Services

NEI General Contracting (NEIGC) was founded in 1998 in the United States and celebrated its 20-year anniversary in October of 2018. The company had a target revenue of $205 million as of 2017...

Read story
Employee Spotlight: Alisha Martin - Account Manager

While she was born in Utah, Alisha Martin has lived all over the world due to her dad being in the military. She has lived in California, Japan, Germany and South Carolina. She joined the hh2 support team in April of...

Read story
The Telegraph: Eight Failures at Grenfell Tower Inferno

Much has been written in the last two days about the fire at the London tragedy at Grenfell Tower, but The Telegraph, a British paper, has put together a scathing article outlining eight failures that led to such a...

Read story
Frank Gehry: Love Him or Hate Him

Despite being named “The Most Important Architect of Our Age,” by Vanity Fair, Frank Gehry got off to a shaky start. According to Gehry, “I was a truck driver in L.A.. . .I tried radio announcing, which I wasn’t..

Read story
Australian High-Rise Made Entirely of Wood

The Green Movement is creating a bit of a time warp in Australia, as builders just revealed they’ll be constructing a nine-story building made entirely of wood. While it isn’t the tallest wooden building in the...

Read story
What is a Starter Home Anymore?

Four years ago, a story caused USA Today writer, Judy Rose, to ask: “When did a new, $300,000, four-bedroom house become a starter home?” To be expected, it was couched as a question about those...

Read story
A Basilica Built to be Completed in 144 Years

La Sagrada Familia, or the Church of the Holy Family, is one of the most long-running architectural projects in the world. The Sagrada Familia, a Catholic basilica in Barcelona, was begun in 1882 by the...

Read story
Korean Highway Transformed into Park

It may seem as though there’s not a lot you can do to remodel a highway. Streets are for driving, and without cars, they’re just narrow strips of concrete in the center of town. Well, Netherlands-based...

Read story
From Furniture to Flight Terminals, Eero Saarinen Designed it All

Some of the most iconic structures in the United States were designed by Eero Saarinen, who emigrated from Finland at age 13. His design work began not with buildings, but with furniture. In 1940, at the age of 30...

Read story
A Smart Watch That Doesn't Sacrifice Looks for Ability

Apple makes some nice-looking devices, but—let’s face it—the Apple watch isn’t one of them. It’s a mini iPhone, and that’s great if you’re a minimalist. But even Dick Tracy’s watch had a better sense of style, and...

Read story
New House Designs Expand Definition of Buildable Space

My grandparents live on a hill overlooking the Salt Lake City valley. They have an amazing view: their second-floor balcony has always been the place to watch the fireworks on the Fourth of July. I remember in 2002...

Read story
The Glass House: by architect Philip Johnson

An icon of modern architecture, the Glass House stands out as both an example of minimalism and an art piece in and of itself. Made of steel, brick and glass—a lot of glass—the house is...

Read story
Frank Lloyd Wright's Ennis House Iconic, Crumbling

Although best known for his iconic Prairie Style (flat or low-sloped roofs, long cantilevers and a strong sense of integration with the landscape), groundbreaking architect Frank Lloyd Wright was also the designer of...

Read story
New Building Proposal Surpasses Technological Capabilities

Architects are always looking for new and wild ideas that, though completely impractical, will stretch the art of construction. The Great American Architect himself, Frank Lloyd Wright, famously proposed...

Read story
I.M. Pei: Iconic Architect Despite Flaws and Challenges

Still working at age 99, Ieoh Ming Pei, better known as I. M. Pei, is the architect behind many iconic construction projects, ranging from the massive and corporate—the 72-story Bank of China masterpiece that...

Read story
Paris Showcases Architectural Security

A new construction project is being unveiled in Paris: an eight-foot tall wall surrounding the base of the Eiffel Tower. It’s being done in response to recent terrorist attacks in the country, including the...

Read story
The Greenest Building on Earth

Opening on Earth Day last year, Seattle’s Bullitt Center has been the greenest building on the planet. You wouldn’t know it to look at it. It appears to be nothing more than a six-story office building...

Read story
Future Exists in “Circular Cities”

By now we’ve heard of the circular economy, a process for making the world more sustainable, creating a cycle that reuses and captures resources. Now, circular economies are turning to urban planning to make our cities into circular cities. Right now, more than half of the population lives in a city, and by 2050 that will rise to two thirds. If we’re going to continue to build up and out, we need to figure out how to better use resources.

Read story

Discover Categories

Want to discover the complete PowerTools blog?
Visit Blog